How to Make a Lesson Plan

A lesson plan is a blueprint or map that teachers use to carry out the objective for the lesson.

Writing a lesson plan for high school students focusing on grammar and writing can be achieved by following the suggested format.

Instructions

Making a Lesson Plan Using Grammar and Writing

1. Write the aim of the lesson on the blackboard.

Write the aim of the lesson you are going to present on the blackboard. Realize that a general broad topic is not practical. State a specific objective. Focus, for example, on teaching the high school class about run-on sentences in conjunction with a story writing assignment.

2.  Look for a motivational device for the lesson plan.

Look for a motivational device for the lesson plan.

Determine how you can motivate the class to be interested in learning what you are going to teach. Write this in your plan. Provide a challenge for the students. Put a humorous run-on sentence on the board. Ask the students why they should change this error. Try to elicit responses such as, "It's awkward. It distorts meaning." Emphasize the need to correct this error so that students will want to do so in their work.

3. Include in your plan specific procedures and activities

Include in your plan specific procedures and activities to realize your objective. Review old materials and add new ones. Develop the concepts and provide for practice. Ask yourself what activities you can use to develop the aim and list them in the plan.

4. Provide for follow-up activities

 Provide for follow-up activities and include them in your lesson plan. Think of a method to reinforce your lesson concepts. Instruct the students to complete the worksheet on run-on sentences for homework and revise the paragraphs written in class. Plan to review these in the next lesson.

5. Evaluate the lesson.

 Evaluate the lesson. Ask yourself if your students reached the objective and learned what was expected. Check the homework assignment and give a weekly quiz on the grammatical principles you taught.

ПЛАН-КОНСПЕКТ УРОКА

__________________________________________

(Тема урока)

1. ФИО (полностью)

2. Место работы

3. Должность

4. Предмет

5. Класс

6. Тема и номер урока в теме

7. Базовый учебник

8. Цель урока:

9. Задачи:

- обучающие

-развивающие

-воспитательные

10. Тип урока

11. Формы работы учащихся

12. Необходимое техническое оборудование

13. Структура и ход урока

 

                                                                      All about me
Topic: Personal interests, likes and dislikes
Aims:
• To help students focus on fluency when speaking
• To develop students’ communication skills
• To develop students’ listening skills
Level: Pre-intermediate or above


Introduction

This lesson provides students with a live listening on the topic of the  teacher’s personal interests and opinions. The students then use this as a model to chat about similar topics with their classmates using basic tenses and a variety of structures.

Procedure
•  Write up three sentences on the board about yourself. Use or adapt the following: I’ve got an older sister. Last week I went ice-skating. I really like going swimming.
•  Tell students that these sentences are about you. Elicit questions they need to ask to find out more about these facts, e.g., How old is your sister? What’s her name? Who did you go ice-skating with? Did you fall over? How often do you go swimming? How many lengths do usually you swim? etc. Write up the questions on the board. Invite students to ask you these, and other, questions.
Answer their questions and explain that if a question is very personal you can respond with I’d rather not answer that question. You could drill this response as students may need to use it later in the lesson.
•  Elicit Me too and Me neither by asking students if they have a sister or brother (or dog, cat…) and then responding appropriately.
•  Ask what you can say if someone tells you something very surprising, e.g., Really? No way! You’re joking! You could practise this language by telling students a few ‘surprising’ things, e.g., I got married in Las Vegas. My dog has only got 3 legs. etc and have them respond appropriately.
•  Project a copy of worksheet 1 onto the board (or hand out copies). Tell the students that they are going to listen to you completing the sentences with your ideas. They shouldn’t write anything yet. All they have to do is listen and ask you questions or give a response after each sentence. Draw their attention to the useful language at the bottom of worksheet 1 and ask them to use these prompts to ask you questions or give a response. Explain that they can answer their questions and explain that if a question is very personal you can respond with I’d rather not answer that question. You could drill this response as students may
need to use it later in the lesson.
Worksheet 1

1) Complete the sentences:
At the weekends………………………………………………………………………….
For breakfast I…………………………………………………………………………….
Yesterday I……………………………………………………………………………….
When I’m older I think I’ll………
Next week I……………………………………………………………………………….

I listen to music when……………………………………………………………………..
I’ve never…………………………………………………………………………………..
Learning English is………………

The best day of the week is………………………………………………………………
At home I have to………………………………………………………………………….
When I was little……………………………………………………………………………
I don’t really like..........................................................................................................
People my age……

I reckon that parents should………………………………………………………………

The best sport is……

2) Now ask questions. Here is some useful language:
Where do you…?When do you…?Why? ……Who …..? What…..?  How….? Really? Me too Me neither

Read out your finished sentences one by one (prepare these before hand unless you're very good at thinking on your feet) and invite volunteers to put up their hands to ask you questions. Pick 'volunteers' if necessary by choosing names in order from the register.

• Feed in quick corrections and language  as necessary. You could also make notes of any common errors for a class correction session later.

Switch off the projected text (or have students turn over their worksheets) and ask students to work in pairs and make notes of anything that you said about yourself.

Set a time limit of 2 minutes to keep this task snappy. Ask 2 or 3 pairs to read their notes to the class and ask others if they agree and whether they can add anything.

Hand out work worksheet 1 (or have students turn over their papers) and give students about 5 minutes (or longer if necessary) to complete the sentences with their ideas. Discourage them from reading what their classmates have written as they are going to talk about their sentences later.

 Set up the classroom so that the students are in two rows facing each other.

Ideally do this with two lines of face-to-face chairs but have students standing if you can’t move the furniture. With an uneven number have a student as a ‘listener’ at one end of a row.
• Students now have one minute to talk to the person directly facing them about the  first sentence only. They should take turns to read out their finished sentences to each other and ask follow up questions or respond as they did previously with the teacher. Remind students that they can respond I’d rather not answer that question if asked about something too personal. Make sure they don’t go on to the next sentence and stop them after one minute (or sooner if they are running out of things to say) by raising your arm and shouting 'Stop!'.

Have students all move one place to the left so that they are now facing a different person (and there is a new ‘listener’ with uneven numbers). Repeat as before with new pairs talking about the second sentence. Monitor and encourage students to
keep speaking English if necessary. Stop them again after about a minute. Continue in the same way with the rest of the sentences or until students run out of steam. With a very small class you can do this activity as a group. Individuals
take turns to read their completed sentences and the others chip in with responses and questions. Split students into two or more groups with a very large class.


Handout worksheet 2.

Have students work in pairs to make notes on anything they can remember about the various people they spoke to. Don’t worry if they can’t remember much at this stage.

Can you remember what your classmates said? Make notes with a partner.

Name                            Information

Put pairs together to makes groups of 4. Students continue to pool their information and add to their notes.
• Ask each group to feedback to the class by saying two things about a classmate. E.g., ‘Sara has Sugar puffs for breakfast. She’s going to her cousin’s party next week’.
• If you want to focus on grammar you could ask students to identify various tenses in their sentences (present simple, past simple, present perfect, future) or structures (should, have to, superlatives) before moving onto more explicit grammar work.

 As an extension activity students could make ‘All about our class’ posters for a wall display. Have students work in small groups to write up their pooled information. They could bring in photographs of themselves and/or take images from the Internet or magazines to illustrate their writing.




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